The Playful Podcast Episode 4 – Glorified Babysitting

In this solo episode I reflect on the fight that ECEs are in to professionalize our work and gain respect by leveraging away from being considered as glorified babysitters. I wander through wonderings about different types of care and education across time, space, and cultures, and ask questions that feel unsettling to my own identity as an ECE. Note: this episode was recorded at the beginning of Sept 2021.

A special note: some of the information I shared in this episode came from being present at events and listening to Indigenous activists share their stories. I tried my best not share information that I would have had to ask permission to share, but I still don’t know how to appropriately cite this kind of knowledge. Therefore, my message to you, if you find this knowledge insightful and motivating, is to get out and physically or virtually attend events run by Indigenous communities to learn about the local knowledge that they hold and that they are willing to share with you.

The statistics I shared about residential schools can be found here:

The book I reference by Kim Anderson and Jessica Ball can be found here (but, if you can, I beg you to find another place to buy it).

The Two-Row Paddle of the Grand information can be found here:

The history of self-care and black panthers; all information I shared was from here:

Carol’s Garboden Murray’s Illuminating Care book and facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/search/top?q=illuminating%20care%3A%20the%20pedagogy%20and%20practice%20of%20care

#boringselfcare posts can be found by @makedaisychains on insta: https://www.instagram.com/p/CHDqLdUBTJn/

Feminist Ethics of Care articles:

  • Langford, R. (Ed.). (2019). Theorizing feminist ethics of care in early childhood practice: Possibilities and dangers. Bloomsbury Publishing.
  • Powell, A., Johnston, L., & Langford, R. (2021). Equity Enacted: Possibilities for Difference in ECEC through a Critical Ethics of Care Approach. Equity as Praxis in Early Childhood Education and Care, 65.

Pay Caregivers Fairly episode on Call Your Girlfriend: https://open.spotify.com/episode/5EIAn1QAR4oDothi3T279x

Instagram posts discussing the suspension of systems of interdependence: https://www.instagram.com/p/CTFBmEBH3Ww/

Ladyweb epsiode on Call your Girlfriend: https://open.spotify.com/episode/0glfXLvhEmLGP70yZyTW9p

Braiding Sweetgrass (Kimmerer)
“Through unity survival. All flourishing is mutual”

How We Show Up, Mia Birdsong: http://www.miabirdsong.com/how-we-show-up

Ontario’s changes to support rec and leisure more: https://www.ontario.ca/page/before-and-after-school-programs-what-parents-and-providers-need-know

Carol Garboden Murray quote about babysitting: https://www.facebook.com/carolgarbodenmurray/photos/a.124546839303044/327023165722076/

Educators as co-learners and researchers: https://www.ontario.ca/page/how-does-learning-happen-ontarios-pedagogy-early-years

#ichosepreschool: https://www.instagram.com/p/CTTVAUrsTgM/?utm_medium=copy_link

The Playful Podcast Episode 3 – Play! (pt. 1)

Brief summary of shownotes and references:

The Playful Podcast Episode 2 – Prerequisites to Play

In this solo episode, I introduce a mini-series that I intend to continue called Pondering Pathways, where I take a walk around my neighbourhood while reflecting on what is required to access play. I follow up from my questions about Treaty 3 from my first episode and then I contemplate some systemic limitations related to ability, race, socioeconomic status, and culture. I take a deep dive into some thoughts about music in early learning, seasonal outdoor play, and what is required to engage with sophisticated environments and tools. This episode is a little bit of an experiment… it’s a bit choppy or distorted at times and includes some input from the more-than-human world.

  • In this episode I start by following up with my action item from the first episode and share some information I learned about what Treaty 3 is. I stumble my way through discussing an article written by Dr. Brittany Lubby and Dr. Alison Norman about Treaty 3, their history class, and Anishinaabe culture. Here is the full quotation: “Caroline Bridge: Due to the large bodies of water being dealt with in Treaty Three, we can speculate that input from the Nation’s women was important. Women in Anishinaabe culture, of which the Mississaugas are a part, are considered “Keepers of Water,” meaning that when it came to the usage of water, their word was likely to have been considered invaluable in 1792.”
  • I briefly mention my reflections on water as a white settler begin with this Instagram post, and the time of writing this there are 7 total posts documenting these reflections, plus a few others in there that are clearly related.
  • As I stepped outside and started discussing outdoor play and nature-based learning, I reflect on the quotation “there’s no such thing as bad weather, only bad clothing”. I had no idea who initially offered this quotation, but with some digging it seems that most people attribute it to Alfred Wainwright although that appears debatable. I need to also say that my reflections about expensive clothing and sensory integration are not my own. I wish I had kept tabs on where I first learned about being critical about this quotation, but I can only track down a few references that I consulted prior to recording this episode:
  1. Regarding how sensory integration occurs outdoors, I learned about this whenI attended a talk by Jon Young and Kathleen Lockyer put on by the Guelph Outdoor School. Kathleen’s website is available here.
  2. I started reflecting on Canadian winter culture after reading this article. Some of the international differences in outdoor play that I referred to are likely discussed here, although I haven’t yet read it (I’ve just read other work by the authors).
  3. A few inspiring resources for playing outdoors with children include the book There’s no Such Thing as Bad Weather, Balanced and Barefoot and Last Child in the Woods,
  4. The clothing library I discussed was from Outdoor Play and Learning as discussed at a Conference by the Council of Outdoor Educators of Ontario.
  5. “..long periods of uninterrupted play” is a concept that is discussed in Ontario’s Pedagogy for the Early Years
  • When I talked about the affordances available in wild spaces, this comes from authors like:
  1. Dr. Mariana Brussoni
  2. Dr. Zahra Zamani
  3. Dr. Helen Little
  • When I reflected on what counts as musical play, I speak from a place of being really inspired by Dr. Susan Young’s work. Here is an example of some of her work related to playing with music in early childhood.

Thanks for listening!

Stay playful

The Playful Podcast. Episode 1 – Playful Pedagogies and Podcastings

Welcome to the podcast! In this solo pilot episode, I introduce myself and my orientations toward play, share some ideas about my intentions for this podcast, and try my hand at defining ‘pedagogy’ from the ECE perspective. After disclosing some of my own playful journey into podcasting, I try answering some rapid fire questions I created for future guests. Let’s hope my dream list of guests will manifest!

  • In the first 4 minutes I introduce myself, discuss my positionality, and share information about the land from which I’m chatting on. I talk about living in a city in Ontario known as 2 Rivers and the historical and contemporary relationships that Indigenous groups have had with the land, which reflects the City of Guelph’s land acknowledgement.
  • Next, I try to define pedagogy, but I noticed I forgot to include to say that it’s the theory and practice of teaching and learning, which is literally in the Wiki definition of pedagogy.
  • I also oooze appreciation for Robin Wall Kimmerer’s Braiding Sweetgrass. If you haven’t bought the booked or got yourself onto the hold list at a local library, seriously, you’ll want to start the process. That book is life changing.
  • The graduate course I talk about around the 13 min mark is called Interdisciplinary Approaches to Family Relations and Human Development at the University of Guelph and the book that I read a quote from is called Research and Reconciliation by Shawn Wilson, Andrea Breen, and Lindsay Dupre.
  • I touch on how this podcast can resemble pedagogical documentation of my learning journey. If you’re not familiar with this terminology, trust that I will explain it more in future episodes. But also, if you are as curious as I am, I’d recommend checking out these resources:
  1. Making Learning Visible
  2. Habits of Documenting
  3. Technology Rich Inquiry Based Research

As always, you can reach my at @playfulpedagogies on instagram and facebook; @playfulpod on twitter, and at kem@playfulpedagogies.ca for feedback or to collab!